How One Smart Scene Can Pull the Weight of Many

How One Smart Scene Can Pull the Weight of Many

By Rachel Garner, Staff Writer
For six years, I couldn’t figure out how to write an opening scene for my book. It’s a running joke among my friends that I’m an obsessive editor—I’ve spent nearly ten years now on the book itself—but my struggles with chapter 1 were especially ridiculous.

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A Girl and Her Goggles: Tips for Writing Steampunk

A Girl and Her Goggles: Tips for Writing Steampunk

By Sarah Noé, Guest Contributor
It might sound like I had all the pieces in place, all the gears turning, for a happy steampunk writing career. However, the sub-genre still held some surprises for me—surprises I want to impart to you. I hope by sharing them that steampunk will appear more accessible if you, too, have an interest in writing it.

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Telling a Religious Story Without Being Preachy, Part 2

Telling a Religious Story Without Being Preachy, Part 2

By Rachel Garner, Staff Writer
Last week, we looked at the problem of “preachiness” in Christian stories, and two major elements to eliminate to avoid coming off as preachy in your own work: Mouthpiece Syndrome and the Willing Recipient. This week, I focus on some other practical ways to address the problem of preachiness, especially when editing important thematic scenes.

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