A Secret to Historical Fiction that Won’t Make Historians Cry

A Secret to Historical Fiction that Won’t Make Historians Cry

By Rachel Garner, Staff Writer
Before suggesting historian-approved ways of actually finding the information you need (next blog post) and exploring philosophies of writing historical fiction (third blog post), I want to explain what the discipline of studying history is and why, when answering writers’ questions, I constantly want to say, “You’re asking this question incorrectly.”

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How to Find Out If Self-Publishing Is Right for You

How to Find Out If Self-Publishing Is Right for You

By Miguel Flores, Guest Contributor
Each method of publishing a book is its own mix of goods, bads, and surprising uglies. On the one hand, traditional publishing offers better access to exposure, expertise, and a vast amount of resources. On the other hand, self-publishing gives you more control over your choices and is much easier to get into. Is one objectively better than the other? I don’t know.

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How One Smart Scene Can Pull the Weight of Many

How One Smart Scene Can Pull the Weight of Many

By Rachel Garner, Staff Writer
For six years, I couldn’t figure out how to write an opening scene for my book. It’s a running joke among my friends that I’m an obsessive editor—I’ve spent nearly ten years now on the book itself—but my struggles with chapter 1 were especially ridiculous.

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A Girl and Her Goggles: Tips for Writing Steampunk

A Girl and Her Goggles: Tips for Writing Steampunk

By Sarah Noé, Guest Contributor
It might sound like I had all the pieces in place, all the gears turning, for a happy steampunk writing career. However, the sub-genre still held some surprises for me—surprises I want to impart to you. I hope by sharing them that steampunk will appear more accessible if you, too, have an interest in writing it.

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