Respecting the Past: A Philosophy for Historical Fiction

Respecting the Past: A Philosophy for Historical Fiction

By Rachel Garner, Staff Writer
If people ask me about nonfiction resources, I’m happy to oblige, cheerfully pelting England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings and other books or articles at them, forgetting that titles like that don’t sound exciting to most people. But when asked for fiction suggestions, I find myself in a sudden quandary.

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A Secret to Historical Fiction that Won’t Make Historians Cry

A Secret to Historical Fiction that Won’t Make Historians Cry

By Rachel Garner, Staff Writer
Before suggesting historian-approved ways of actually finding the information you need (next blog post) and exploring philosophies of writing historical fiction (third blog post), I want to explain what the discipline of studying history is and why, when answering writers’ questions, I constantly want to say, “You’re asking this question incorrectly.”

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Myths: How Do We Use Them in Stories Today?

Myths: How Do We Use Them in Stories Today?

By Justin Ferguson, Guest Contributor
In my last post, I discussed the role of mythology and the particular power it has in storytelling. Here I would like to examine a couple ways we can incorporate myths into our own stories. Some writers make subtle, brief allusions to myths that are intended to add a “bonus” layer of meaning for those who will notice. But two more significant ways myths can be used are in retellings and original work.

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Writing a Novel with Multiple Narrators

Writing a Novel with Multiple Narrators

Gabrielle de Waal, Staff Writer
How can I demonstrate the variety of cultures and people groups in my story world without detracting from the main thread of the story? Surely one-off visits to unfamiliar cultures with one or two other characters (soon to be left behind) would quickly move from a novelty to a gimmick. Reluctantly, I began to consider multiple perspectives.

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