Veteran Students on Overcoming Writing Weaknesses, Part 1

Veteran Students on Overcoming Writing Weaknesses, Part 1

Compiled by Staff
We asked several One Year Adventure Novel (OYAN) students to tell us what their biggest area of weakness is in writing, and what strategies they employ to overcome it. This week, we feature eight different students and their responses.

Read More
Writing a Novel with Multiple Narrators

Writing a Novel with Multiple Narrators

Gabrielle de Waal, Staff Writer
How can I demonstrate the variety of cultures and people groups in my story world without detracting from the main thread of the story? Surely one-off visits to unfamiliar cultures with one or two other characters (soon to be left behind) would quickly move from a novelty to a gimmick. Reluctantly, I began to consider multiple perspectives.

Read More
What Makes a Fairy Tale a Fairy Tale?

What Makes a Fairy Tale a Fairy Tale?

Addison Lucchi, Guest Contributor
When I try to answer the “what is a fairytale” question in conversation, I usually answer the same way George MacDonald did: I simply recommend my favorite fairy tales… “Read Peter Pan!” I say. “Read Grimm, read Anderson, read Stardust, read the Narnia books… and perhaps by reading all of those, you will then understand what a fairy tale is.”

Read More
What Re-Entry Stress Can Teach You about Your Changed Character

What Re-Entry Stress Can Teach You about Your Changed Character

Jake Buller, Guest Contributor
Sometimes when people talk about cross-cultural interactions, they put the emphasis on culture shock. What is more rarely spoken of (but common to the experience of those who cross cultures) is what is sometimes called reverse culture shock. It’s getting culture shock in your own culture. It’s also an aspect of story that is sometimes neglected by writers.

Read More